Another take on difficult fonts

Our overriding suggestion for the design of your presentation is to keep things simple.  As little text on each slide as possible, limited color schemes, clear images and easy to read fonts.  So you’d never want to use a difficult, goofy font like the much loathed Comic Sans, right?  Maybe there are times to reconsider this.

Here’s an interesting bit of counterintuitive news from a study of reading retention.

Fonts, or styles of typeface, that are relatively difficult to read (including the much-maligned Comic Sans) help people learn new information, according to a new study. The font effect works both in lab experiments and in real classrooms, perhaps by forcing students to work harder to process the information.

You can find the whole article here:

Difficult Fonts Improve Learning

We’d still suggest that you want your presentations to look clean and professional and that a font like Comic Sans is probably inappropriate in a business setting.  Remember that presentations aren’t always delivered in ideal settings and that it’s most important that your audience is able to see what you put up on the screen.

On the other hand, there are times to make an exception.  An entire presentation in a difficult font might be frustrating and exhausting, but think of the impact you might make by using a different font in one place.  A word or two in an unusual font could make a big impact.

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2 thoughts on “Another take on difficult fonts

  1. Pingback: Presentation Visual Aids: Some Fonts Are More Believable Than Others | BulletProof Presentations

  2. Pingback: Visual Aids: Netanyahu’s Cartoon Bomb | BulletProof Presentations

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