Remote and Online Presentations: You Need a Plan

Remote presentations aren’t easy. Honestly, I find them terrifying and would much rather stand up and speak in front of a huge crowd than try to train two people on a conference call. You lose so much of your ability to connect with an audience that it often feels like you’re speaking into a void, and there are seemingly infinite technical issues that can go badly, embarrassingly, wrong.

The last time I reluctantly agreed to do remote training my co-presenter kept getting dropped from the call, he spent most of his time offline dealing with the telecom operator, and the presentation software kept randomly advancing my slides. Needless to say, it’s challenging to provide decent training in a situation like that, especially when you’re supposed to be teaching people how to give better presentations.

Let’s hope we can all learn from other peoples’ failures.

This article from Slate describes how a similar situation, an online class called Fundamentals of Online Education, went awry in horrifying, yet predictable, ways. But while my disaster happened with an audience of about 100, this one unfolded in front of more than 40,000 people who had signed up to learn how to successfully deliver classes like the one they were trying to attend.

Unfortunately, experiences like these will continue to be common. Despite the fact that live meetings, training, and presentations are undoubtedly more effective, tight budgets for travel and training mean that more and more of our interactions will be driven to the web. So how are you supposed to make them effective? First of all, you need to have a plan. As one attendee commented on the Fundamentals of Online Education class:

It was not technical issues that derailed this course [which was a symptom], it is the underlying philosophy that many institutions still hold onto—that a MOOC is similar to, or the same as, a course in a traditional face-to-face classroom, and it can be successful using the same structure, same content and similar instructional methods. MOOC courses offered through Cousera and other such platforms, often appear modified to ‘fit’ into a course experience on the Web, albeit with thousands of students.

In other words, you can’t treat a remote class or presentation the same way you would a live one. You have to have a plan for how you’re going to use the technology, how you’re going to overcome the distance between yourself and the audience in order to engage them, what you’re going to do if 40,000 people sign up. Remote presentations create a very different set of challenges than live ones, and you’re going to have to work harder if you want to make them successful.

BulletProof is here to help.

BulletProof Presentations

http://www.slate.com/blogs/future_tense/2013/02/05/mooc_meltdown_coursera_course_on_fundamentals_of_online_education_ends_in.html

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