Learn The Gettysburg Address (But Don’t Try To Memorize Your Own)

Memorizing you own speech is almost never a good idea. Reciting something word for word usually sounds stiff and unnatural, and can be a disaster for speakers who forget their place in the middle and can’t get back on track without starting over from the beginning.

But this video accompanying Ken Burns’ “Learn the Address” project is a good way to introduce kids (and the rest of us) to a bit of history by encouraging them to memorize the Gettysburg Address. Which is a pretty manageable exercise since it’s less than two minutes long and so much of the language is already familiar to most people. It’s also kind of fun to see who does well with their line readings (generally the newsreaders and politicians) and who doesn’t quite manage the gravitas (Taylor Swift) to pull it off.

You can also spend time browsing all the other videos people have posted of themselves reciting the speech. Didn’t know what Vicki Lawrence has been up to lately? She’s been learning the Gettysburg Address!

Gettysburg Address “Mashup”

Learn The Gettysburg Address (But Don’t Try To Memorize Your Own)

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Bill Clinton’s 2012 DNC Speech

Here’s a pretty amazing document, a redline showing the difference between Bill Clinton’s prepared speech (which was what he saw on the teleprompters) and what he actually said in the best-reviewed speech of either convention this year. What’s most impressive is how he was able to embellish what was already there while keeping the flow of his argument intact and making the whole thing sound natural.

Despite the disapproval from some corners of the political universe, speeches like these are typically read from teleprompters for a reason–it’s very difficult for most human beings to deliver an extended speech without losing some details or rhetorical flourishes in the language. Of course it’s possible to memorize a speech word for word like an actor might, but the result usually sounds robotic and stilted. But this speech has none of those problems and probably does a better job of engaging the audience than what he had written would have.

Still, I wouldn’t recommend this kind of riffing as a strategy for beginners. Clinton’s ability to take the script in front of him and augment it on the fly shows what a pro he is, and how confident he was that no one would mind his going a little long…

http://www.theatlanticwire.com/politics/2012/09/what-bill-clinton-said-vs-what-he-wrote/56562/

Bill Clinton at the Flight 93 Memorial: Shanksville PA, 9/10/11

It’s hard to imagine anyone doing a better job with this speech. The stories of sacrifice are almost overwhelming to begin with, but the way Clinton speaks slowly and uses the hoarse and raspy quality of his aging voice adds even more emotion to the heroism of the people who died on Flight 93. Listen how his tone changes when he starts to talk about fundraising at the end of the clip.

Whatever you may think of Clinton personally, it’s hard to deny that the man is a skilled and talented speaker.